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Steps to my Webquest
  1. Choose a topic from US history and get it okayed. (2/10/11)
  2. Research topic: Who, what, when, where, and why. (2/14/11)
  3. Make a good title for my rough draft with the W's stated. (2/15/11)
  4. Turn in the final draft. (2/17/11)

Racial Equality


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WHO was involved? John Howard Griffin was on the search for racial equality. These were the questions the journalist and novelist asked himself, “If a white man became a Negro in the Deep South, what adjustments would he have to make? What is it like to experience discrimination based on skin color, something over which one has no control?" John Griffin artificially darkened his skin to pass as a black man.
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WHAT were they seeking? John was looking for the answers to these questions. He wanted to know what African Americans went through everyday, even after the laws were passed that said discrimination was illegal. John went on a journey to explain the difficulties black people faced in certain areas.
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WHEN in history did this occur? In October of 1959 and through the first half of 1960, John Griffin traveled through the states in the Deep South. It happened during a tumultuous time in United States history. Lyndon Johnson was president, and Martin Luther King Jr. was fighting for equal rights for all United States citizens.
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WHERE in the United States (geographically)? In the states Louisianan, Mississippi, Georgia, and Alabama, John Howard Griffin hitchhiked and rode greyhound buses.
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WHY is change being called for? Change is being called for because no one deserves to be treated differently because of something they cannot help. For example, blacks and whites used different public toilets, ate at different restaurants, and the children played at different parks. In fact, the White's facilities were better quality, and much cleaner than the Black's facilities. African Americans were being treated unjustly because of their skin color; therefore, this white man brought it upon himself to go down South and experience segregation for himself. This man soon after wrote a book that impacted the country.

My Bibliography

http://www.writework.com/essay/q-and-session-black-like-me-john-howard-griffin-answered-q
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Like_Me
http://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=122370


Final Draft

The Search For Racial Equality
“If a white man became a Negro in the Deep South, what adjustments would he have to make? What is it like to experience discrimination based on skin color, something over which one has no control?" John Howard Griffin asked himself these questions before he went to the Southern states to find out firsthand what racial segregation feels like.

John Howard Griffin went down to the Deep South to discover what African Americans went through every day. After he went to a dermatologist and received radiation treatments and darkening techniques, John Griffin became a black man. While Lyndon Johnson was president and Martin Luther King Jr. was fighting for equal rights for all Americans, John Griffin artificially darkened his skin to pass as an African American. During a time of racial segregation, from October of 1959 through the first half of 1960, Mr. Griffin went through Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia, and Alabama. He could be seen hitchhiking and riding Greyhound buses. In this period, everything was different for Americans depending on the color of their skin. The pools they swam in, the restaurants they ate at, and the schools they went to all were segregated. It was wrong to hang out or even talk to people who shared the same values, liked the same things, and were the same on the inside, but looked differently on the outside. Discrimination was alive and well in the South. There were no more slaves, everybody was the same now right? It’s true that there were no more slaves, but Blacks and Whites were still treated differently. Just because the Black and the White Facilities were separate doesn’t mean they were equal. They did have different places to eat and have fun. But how much fun would it be to eat at a grimy old restaurant, or swim in a dirty swimming pool?
Change was being called for. No one deserved to be treated differently because of the color of their skin. John Howard Griffin was a journalist and a novelist and wrote a book called, Black Like Me. In that book he described the issue of segregation and what everybody knew was wrong, even the people doing it. He went through some people’s worst nightmares of not fitting in. In the South however, color wasn’t a matter of fitting in but a matter of life and death.
By: Maddie Baroch