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Steps:
Topic 2-10-11
5 W's 2-11-11
Title
Rough Draft 2-15-11
Final Draft 2-17-11
At least one Picture

5 W's
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nellie_Bly
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/world/sfeature/memoir.html
WHO was involved? Nellie Bly and Joseph Pulitzer (Nellie's boss who gave her the undercover assignment

WHAT were they fighting for/seeking? They were fighting to expose the conditions at the Woman's Lunatic Asylum on Blackwells Island

WHEN in history did this occur? This happened in the 1880's

WHERE in the United States (geographically)? Woman's Lunatic Asylum on Blackwells Island

WHY is changed being called for? There were a lot of people that didn't need to be there and the people who needed to be there weren't properly treated so they didn't get all the help they needed because everyone was focused on the people who shouldn't have been there

WHAT change is being called for? She wants to change the food and how the patients are being treated.


Elizabeth Jane Cochran was born May 5, 1864 in Pennsylvania. Her journalist career started when she wrote to the editor when she didn’t like a sexist column in the Pittsburgh Dispatch. He was so impressed with her spirit that he asked her to join the paper. Her pen name was Nellie Bly from the popular song “Nellie Bly” written by Stephen Foster. She wanted to investigate and write about the women working in factories but the editors wanted her to write about things like fashion and gardening. So she moved to Mexico to be a foreign correspondent. While in Mexico she protested the imprisonment of a local journalist. When the Mexican authorities found out about what she wrote they threatened to arrest her so she moved back home. She decided to leave the Dispatch and instead she went to New York and she joined the New York World.

When she got to The World she took an undercover assignment where she had to fake insanity to get into the Women's Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell’s Island. She practiced for days on her expression then the boarders decided she was crazy and when they called the police who took her to a courtroom and even they decided she was insane so she got taken to the insane Asylum. When she got there the doctors there checked her out and said she was insane so the head doctor came in and he was convinced she was insane. In her time there, Nellie saw that the food was inedible, patient care was horrendous, and she thought that some of the people were just as sane as she was. The food contained bad meat, bread that was pretty much just dried-up dough, gross broth, and dirty water. Even though the food was terrible the eating area was even worse so if you decided to eat, it would be so terrible. They had rats crawling around everywhere. The people that were dangerous were tied together with ropes and the other patients had to sit on hard, cold benches, get buckets of water poured onto their heads, and put up with the nurses yelling at them and beating them if they didn’t listen. They did take walks, however they had to walk in a straight line with nurses on either side of them. Nellie said "...The insane asylum on Blackwell's Island is a human rat-trap. It is easy to get in, but once there it is impossible to get out.

The World told them who Nellie was so they had to let her out. Her report, that was later published as “Ten Days in a Madhouse” brought her lasting fame. All of the people at the asylum and the doctors who examined her were trying to explain how she tricked everyone. She got them to investigate the conditions and the Department of Public Charities and Corrections got money for the care of insane people. They also hired doctors so that people that weren’t insane, like Nellie and a ton of the other people wouldn’t get submitted into the Asylum.


Final Draft

Elizabeth Jane Cochran was born May 5, 1864 in Pennsylvania. Her journalist career started when she wrote to the editor when she didn’t like a sexist column in the Pittsburgh Dispatch. He was so impressed with her spirit that he asked her to join the paper. Her pen name was Nellie Bly from the popular song “Nellie Bly” written by Stephen Foster. She wanted to investigate and write about the women working in factories but the editors wanted her to write about things like fashion and gardening. So she moved to Mexico to be a foreign correspondent. While in Mexico she protested the imprisonment of a local journalist. When the Mexican authorities found out about what she wrote they threatened to arrest her so she moved back home. She decided to leave the Dispatch and instead she went to New York and she joined the New York World.

When she got to The World in 1887 she took an undercover assignment where she had to fake insanity to get into the Women's Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell’s Island. She practiced for days on her expression then the boarders decided she was crazy and when they called the police who took her to a courtroom and even they decided she was insane so she got taken to the insane Asylum. When she got there the doctors there checked her out and said she was insane so the head doctor came in and he was convinced she was insane. In her time there, Nellie saw that the food was inedible, patient care was horrendous, and she thought that some of the people were just as sane as she was. The food contained bad meat, bread that was pretty much just dried-up dough, gross broth, and dirty water. Even though the food was terrible the eating area was even worse so if you decided to eat, it would be so terrible. They had rats crawling around everywhere. The people that were dangerous were tied together with ropes and the other patients had to sit on hard, cold benches, get buckets of water poured onto their heads, and put up with the nurses yelling at them and beating them if they didn’t listen. They did take walks, however they had to walk in a straight line with nurses on either side of them. Nellie said that the asylum was like a rat trap easy to get into yet so hard to get out of.

After ten days World told them who Nellie was so they had to let her out. Her report, that was later published as “Ten Days in a Madhouse” brought her lasting fame. All of the people at the asylum and the doctors who examined her were trying to explain how she tricked everyone. She got them to investigate the conditions and the Department of Public Charities and Corrections got money for the care of insane people. They also hired doctors so that people that weren’t insane, like Nellie and a ton of the other people wouldn’t get submitted into the Asylum.


Ten_days_n_a_madhouse.jpgNellie_Bly.jpg